Keith Hahn

 

Calisthenics On Demand Exercise or C.O.D.E. is a London-based fitness service provider that helps individuals achieve their fitness goals by utilising a new age blend of functional training methodologies – using minimal equipment, and extreme calisthenics; body weight leverage movements.

Why do Calisthenics?

These exercises can be done virtually anywhere and don’t require much space or equipment. They mimic the body’s natural movements and can be tailored to any fitness level for a functional total-body workout. One of the many advantages of calisthenics is that once the basics are learned and mastered, the exercises can be performed at a higher resistance and intensity and combined in different variations to fit any workout routine. Below are the top 10 calisthenics exercises to get your body ready for summer -ranked by fitness effectiveness, skill and difficulty level for upper, lower, full body and core.

Top 10 Calisthenics exercises

Upper body

1. Pull up (overhand grip): Hanging on an overhead bar whilst using your posterior chain (muscle groups behind you) to pull your body weight up to the bar.

Benefits: Full muscle recruitment/engagement, can be performed with different variations and levels of intensity, portable/convenient, V-shape, improves grip strength, accelerates fat loss and production of growth hormone.

2. Chin up (underhand grip): Hanging on an overhead bar whilst using your anterior (muscle groups in front of you) and posterior chain (muscle groups behind you) to pull your body weight up to the bar.

Benefits: Develops full range of pull motion, can be performed in different variations and levels of intensity, strengthens biceps, portable/convenient, V-shape, improves grip strength, accelerates fat loss and production of growth hormone.

3. Press up: Using your upper body to push your full body weight off of the ground whilst facing downwards.Press up

Benefits: Develops full range of push motion (shortening and lengthening of the arms) off the ground, increases strength primarily in chest, triceps and core muscle groups.

4. Dips: Using your upper body to lower your body weight downward (arms at a 90 degree angle) whilst over a heightened area/bar.

Benefits: Develops full range of push motion (shortening and lengthening of the arms) off the ground, increases strength primarily in chest, triceps and core muscle groups.

Lower bodySquatting (1)

5. Squat:Using your lower body to lower your body weight into a 90 degree sitting position whilst keeping your upper torso upright (chest up, shoulders back).

Benefits: Develops full range of motion for the legs (shortening and lengthening of the muscles), increases strength primarily in glutes and hamstrings.

6. Lunge: Using your lower body to position one leg forward (with the knee bent) whilst lowering the opposite back leg to the ground (knee to ground).

Keith Hahn - C.O.D.E

Keith Hahn – C.O.D.E

Benefits: Develops muscular strength and endurance, coordination and balance of the lower body muscle groups, increases strength primarily in glutes, hamstrings and quadriceps.

Full body

7. Burpee: In one motion, lowering your body weight into an upright plank (legs extended) and then tucking your knees back to chest to standing position in one fluid explosive movement.

Benefits: Increases metabolic conditioning (fat-loss), improves strength in the upper/lower/core muscle groups and can be performed anywhere.

8. Mountain climber: Maintaining your body weight in an upright plank whilst alternating each knee to your chest at an efficient tempo.

Benefits: Increases metabolic conditioning (fat-loss), develops core strength (through tensing your core muscles throughout the exercise) and develops hip explosiveness (driving the knees to chest).

Core

9. Leg flutter: Using your lower body to tense your core whilst lying on your back or stomach, fully extending your legs outwards and alternating them up and down.

Benefits: Develops strength primarily in the lower part of the core, increases metabolic conditioning (fat-loss) and improves quadriceps strength.

10. Plank: Maintaining your body weight facing down whilst legs are fully extended and knees up (on elbows or hands).

Benefits: Develops strength primarily in the upper and lower parts of the core, increases metabolic conditioning (fat-loss) and improves quadriceps strength.

About the author: Keith Hahn is a strength and conditioning coach, and Director of CodeFIT a new fitness platform that utilises minimal equipment and extreme calisthenics; body weight leverage movements.

To improve on your overall body weight strength and conditioning through one on one or group training please email Keith at codefitness4u@gmail.com  to get a free consultation.